Kinesiology Research

Research in Kinesiology is dynamic and focuses on physical activity, human movement and biobehavioral factors that improve health and human performance and prevent disease in individuals and communities.

Faculty research interests are focused on biopsychosocial determinants of exercise and health, determinants of obesity-related behaviors in at-risk populations, pediatric and adolescent health and wellness, and health disparities in diet and physical activity behavior.


Current Faculty Projects

Running W.I.S.E. (2019-2020)
Kabiri L, Diep C, Perkins-Ball A, Rodriguez A

Running W.I.S.E. (with Interscholastic Student Engagement) is a collaborative research study pairing college students with youth in community schools through exercise. Combining elements of a walk-to-jog program with a mentor system, college students will train twice weekly with elementary students to improve their cardiorespiratory fitness during 10 weeks of training. Research objectives include: 1) Improving health-related physical fitness (body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular fitness), 2) Increasing physical activity levels, 3) Improving self-concept and/or self-efficacy and self-esteem, 4) Improving perception and enjoyment of physical activity, and 5) Improving classroom behavior and academic performance.(Data collection complete, currently analyzing and prepping for dissemination)

POWER UP: Participating Online While Exercising to Recover
Swartz M, Schadler K, Swartz M (PI). Basen-Engquist K, Fry C, Kabiri L,Lyons E, Mama S, Peterson S (Co-I)

POWER UP: Participating Online While Exercising to Recover is a collaborative research study with M.D. Anderson Cancer Center to test the effect of a 12-week remotely delivered, group-based active video game centered lifestyle physical activity intervention on function, quality of life, and potential serum biomarkers of function in 15-39 year olds who recently completed treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma or a central nervous system tumor.(Data collection disrupted due to COVID-19 pandemic, opportunity for future virtual internships TBA)

SEARCH: Schooling Effects on Activity and Resilience during Confinement atHome
Kabiri L, Ray B

In partnership with the National Home Education Research Institute, (SEARCH) aims to examine potential relationships between schooling type and physical and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Public school, private school, and homeschool children and adolescents aged 10-18 years as well as their parents will complete physical activity logs and resilience surveys. ​​Specific to the current pandemic, primary research objectives include: 1) Exploring effects of schooling type on physical activity among children and adolescents, and 2) Exploring effects of schooling type on resilience among children and adolescents. Secondary research objectives include: 1) Exploring relationships between physical activity and resilience among youth and adults, 2) Examining potential disparities between groups (socioeconomic, urban/rural, etc.) in physical activity, 3) Examining potential disparities between groups (socioeconomic, urban/rural, etc.) on resilience, and 4) Correlating child and parent/guardian activity levels and/or resilience.(Currently awaiting IRB approval)


Future Faculty Projects

The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Stress Disparities among College Students
Diep C*, Kabiri L,* Perkins H, Perkins-Ball A, Rodriguez A
* Denotes co-PI

The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Stress Disparities among College Students is a descriptive study of nutrition, PA, and stress among 200 college students between the ages of 18-25 who attend a college in the Gulf Coast Region during the spring of 2020. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nutrition, PA, and stress among college students in the Gulf Coast Region. It explores disparities by living situation, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and other factors. We hypothesize that the COVID-19 pandemic will have an adverse impact on nutrition, PA, and stress and that there will be disparities among college students, including poorer nutrition, decreased PA, and higher stress among racial/ethnic and low-income students.


KINESIOLOGY DEPARTMENT

S203 Tudor Fieldhouse
kinesiologydept@rice.edu

(713)348-8816 (Office)
(713)348-8808 (Fax)

PHYSICAL ADDRESS

6100 Main St, MS-545 Houston, TX 77005

Our offices are located on the 2nd floor of Tudor Fieldhouse on the east side of the building. The easiest way to access our suite is to enter through the east side door that faces the intramural fields and Wiess College. You will then go up the stairway to the 2nd floor, and our suite will be through the open door ahead on the right.